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big a
01-09-2017, 04:58 PM
Hey guys long time no talk, still lurking in background enjoying a good cigar when I can. I was curious if anyone has had a fusion on their lower back and had any input on their experience? Really hoping it doesn't come to that yet, but trying to be prepared.

I'm on my second herniated disc and after how bad the first one was a fusion is very realistic outcome now. Going to try the shoots but the doctor doesn't seem to sold it will work. Working on getting a 2nd opinion in the mean time too. Thanks in advance.

RevSmoke
01-09-2017, 05:38 PM
Hey guys long time no talk, still lurking in background enjoying a good cigar when I can. I was curious if anyone has had a fusion on their lower back and had any input on their experience? Really hoping it doesn't come to that yet, but trying to be prepared.

I'm on my second herniated disc and after how bad the first one was a fusion is very realistic outcome now. Going to try the shoots but the doctor doesn't seem to sold it will work. Working on getting a 2nd opinion in the mean time too. Thanks in advance.

Cannot speak on a lower back fusion from personal experience. I had a cervical decompression (removal of calcified growth impinging on nerves at the radiating point of the spinal cord/column).

Know others who have had fusions. I believe it depends on the complexity and severity. But the ones closest to me have had good results.

Will keep you in my prayers!

Peace of the Lord be with you.

icehog3
01-09-2017, 05:43 PM
I had a cervical fusion in 1989, not exactly the same, but if you have any questions yopu think I could help with, feel free to ask.

longknocker
01-09-2017, 05:54 PM
One Problem With Lower Back Surgery Is The Next Level Up Or Down Eventually Becomes Weak Or Herniates Or Bulges. I've Had A Bad Back For Years And Never Had Surgery. A Good Friend Of Mine Who Is A Orthopedic Surgeon Told Me That If You Have Back Pain Without Any Leg Pain Or Weakness, Don't Have Surgery. The Back Pain Will Eventually Go Away After 2-3 Years. Prayers For Your Pain To Be Resolved And For You To Make The Right Decision In Your Medical Care.:tu

big a
01-09-2017, 06:19 PM
Thanks guys, that's the problem is the pain is in my leg/ ass, back doesn't feel too bad at all. Last time it pinched my spinal cord, and then leaked when he cleaned it up. Now 8 weeks later the next one up is herniated. And at the age of 28 he can almost guarantee if I get a fusion I'll have more problems later. The recovery and long term affects is what has me worried.

Remo
01-09-2017, 07:18 PM
I have passed on the surgery, I have a bad back but it is not in my legs, they want to do the fusion but for now I have held off and will continue as long as the pain stays in my back.

nutcracker
01-09-2017, 08:11 PM
This is my day job. Feel free to contact me offline via a pm.

In your state the real doyen of spine surgery (Ed Benzel) is at the Cleveland Clinic. If you need to get serious, he's your man!

Greentud
01-10-2017, 06:55 AM
Has L5 S1 fused in 2008. Had it done in Boston. Pre- surgery I could not stand for more than five minutes. Post surgery I felt great. I am still a bit limited in how long I can stand and how long I can walk. It still was the best option for me and I'm glad I had it done.

Good luck with whatever you do. I feel your pain.

Tio Gato
01-14-2017, 05:04 PM
2nd opinion is wise.:2

bruceolee
01-23-2017, 04:44 PM
I've been working in physical therapy for 17 years now and I've done inpatient therapy and outpatient therapy. The best recommendations I can make to you is avoid and orthopedic doc to do your surgery and go with a Neurosurgeon instead. I'm sure there are many fine Ortho docs that can do amazing fusions but when the rubber meets the road and after 17 years of working with both, Neurosurgeons always seem to get better surgical outcomes than orthos. That's just my :2 and if you have any questions just let me know

billybarue
01-25-2017, 09:50 PM
I've been working in physical therapy for 17 years now and I've done inpatient therapy and outpatient therapy. The best recommendations I can make to you is avoid and orthopedic doc to do your surgery and go with a Neurosurgeon instead. I'm sure there are many fine Ortho docs that can do amazing fusions but when the rubber meets the road and after 17 years of working with both, Neurosurgeons always seem to get better surgical outcomes than orthos. That's just my :2 and if you have any questions just let me know

My wife is a pain Doc in a neuro group. She did her residency at Stanford and pain fellowship at Harvard. If you try the pain doc route make sure you get one with a fellowship specialization in the field. Lots of Docs claim the title. Even still; PT, steroid injections, nerve oblation, spinal chord implants can only do so much and for certain situations.

If cutting time comes I'd suggest sticking with the neurosurgeons as well.

big a
01-25-2017, 10:21 PM
Thanks everyone for the input and help. Still working on a second opinion while I await my first shot in a couple weeks. My doctor that did the first surgery is a neurosurgeon.

hotreds
01-26-2017, 07:13 AM
My back is beyond shot! Did some stoopid things as a yout- including buying a pair of iron boots( do they even have those things anymore??!!) and immediately doing leg lifts with same( was barely able to stand up the next day.) My ortho told me I probably would/should have surgery, but as I talked to more and more people this is what I was told: 1/3 show improvement, 1/3 stay the same, 1/3 get worse. So, I'm going to avoid this if at all possible, but, as always, YMMV.

mosesbotbol
01-26-2017, 12:48 PM
I herniated a lower disk like 15 years ago and did all the treatments you can think of outside of surgery. Don't do more the 2 cortisone shots and leave surgery as an absolute last resort. It's better to live with slight pain than risk surgery.

My recommendations after a lot of professional medical and sports expertise are:

Stretching legs, hip, rear end, and lower back; daily.
Chiropractor - they will set the frequency.
Strengthening core with Pilates or Yoga - be careful with Yoga; it is not contest, don't worry what other are doing in class...

The stretching allows the back relieve the pressure on the spine and allow the spine to sit naturally along with chiropractic adjustment. If the spine straight and supple, all the energy can flow correct from nerves. I

If you are straight, limber, & strong core with still debilitating pain; then you are a candidate for surgery or next steps.

Chainsaw13
01-26-2017, 01:11 PM
I herniated a lower disk like 15 years ago and did all the treatments you can think of outside of surgery. Don't do more the 2 cortisone shots and leave surgery as an absolute last resort. It's better to live with slight pain than risk surgery.

My recommendations after a lot of professional medical and sports expertise are:

Stretching legs, hip, rear end, and lower back; daily.
Chiropractor - they will set the frequency.
Strengthening core with Pilates or Yoga - be careful with Yoga; it is not contest, don't worry what other are doing in class...

The stretching allows the back relieve the pressure on the spine and allow the spine to sit naturally along with chiropractic adjustment. If the spine straight and supple, all the energy can flow correct from nerves. I

If you are straight, limber, & strong core with still debilitating pain; then you are a candidate for surgery or next steps.

Coincidentally this popped up in my FB feed.

12 yoga poses for beginners
http://www.active.com/fitness/articles/12-yoga-poses-for-non-flexible-people?cmp=17N-PB2-S34-T6-D4-01262017-1124

big a
01-28-2017, 09:06 AM
I herniated a lower disk like 15 years ago and did all the treatments you can think of outside of surgery. Don't do more the 2 cortisone shots and leave surgery as an absolute last resort. It's better to live with slight pain than risk surgery.

My recommendations after a lot of professional medical and sports expertise are:

Stretching legs, hip, rear end, and lower back; daily.
Chiropractor - they will set the frequency.
Strengthening core with Pilates or Yoga - be careful with Yoga; it is not contest, don't worry what other are doing in class...

The stretching allows the back relieve the pressure on the spine and allow the spine to sit naturally along with chiropractic adjustment. If the spine straight and supple, all the energy can flow correct from nerves. I

If you are straight, limber, & strong core with still debilitating pain; then you are a candidate for surgery or next steps.

Thanks for the advice. I'm back in pt doing more core building and stretching. Already feeling slight relief. The pain is not bad this time so I'm really hopeful I can manage it and get in better shape, work on core and stretching and avoid surgery for as long as possible.

All my doctors have said absolutely not to go to a chiropractor. I know this is always a big topic for back issues, not looking to start that debate lol.

mosesbotbol
01-28-2017, 12:27 PM
Thanks for the advice. I'm back in pt doing more core building and stretching. Already feeling slight relief. The pain is not bad this time so I'm really hopeful I can manage it and get in better shape, work on core and stretching and avoid surgery for as long as possible.

All my doctors have said absolutely not to go to a chiropractor. I know this is always a big topic for back issues, not looking to start that debate lol.

Stretching is the epicenter and foundation for health, fitness, and well being. You are as old as your spine is supple.