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pullins10
08-11-2015, 07:10 AM
How long should you age a CC before smoking? I've heard different things and thought this would be the perfect place to get some thoughts?

as always, thanks OG's

:tu

CigarNut
08-11-2015, 07:23 AM
This is really a matter of personal choice. Some CC's smoke well fresh and some smoke well after being set aside for some time. The amount of aging can vary from months to years. I think it also varies due to differences in storage temperature and RH.

When I get my cigars I give them a try -- if they are not smoking to my liking then I put them down for a bit -- usually a couple of months and then try them again -- repeating as needed.

massphatness
08-11-2015, 08:13 AM
There's no right answer to this question, and like Michael said, it's a matter of personal preference. Many cigars, like many wines, are great fresh. Others mature over time and undergo multiple flavor changes as they age. Personally, I prefer the more nuanced flavor of a cigar that's sat for 10-15+ years. However, that doesn't stop me from smoking & enjoying recent production sticks.

One rule of thumb I do try to follow: when a new shipment of cigars arrives at my house, I try to let them sit for a couple months or more to give them time to settle down from their journey, all the jostling around and the various environmental changes they've been subjected to in transit (including the trip to the freezer that every box makes before I'll put it in my humidor: no beetles for this guy).

Experiment! Find what you like then experiment some more.

Good luck on the journey

icehog3
08-11-2015, 09:34 AM
Well said by Michael and Vin, adding my thoughts would just be redundant.

markem
08-11-2015, 09:41 AM
Great advice here. I'll add this: if you can trade for some older sticks, then you can see what you *might* be able to expect from ones you age. Personally, I like at least 3-5 years on mine but also have some that are amazing fresh. I can't seem to keep my hands off my fresh Monte 4s and RASCC.

Oh yeah, ditto what Tom said about redundancy ;)

hwgoesit
08-11-2015, 09:44 AM
I have found that fresh arrivals need a month at least. Possibly due to the air shipments t, or wet conditions most vendors use for storage.
Long term aging to meld flavors is an entirely different and interesting question. I have had cigars change radically after just a few years of aging. The duration probably depends on the tobacco used and how it was cured so the length of time for aging is a variable that is difficult to Nial down.

mosesbotbol
08-11-2015, 10:52 AM
Most basic; 1 year or under for fresh punchy cigars or after 3 years to pass "sick period" of in-box fermentation that happens later on.

Weelok
08-11-2015, 10:53 AM
Fascinating question. I don't have much experience with aged ISOM cigars but can offer up a nice bit of trivial information. Historically you were supposed to age CC's a minimum of two years and the cigars were constructed assuming you were going to do this. By historical I mean probably pre-boom or so. The reason offered up is Cubans didn't age their cigars after rolling and fresh they were harsh.

My understanding is competition with cigar manufacturers in the last decade has forced Cuba to up its game and construct the cigars to be smoked ROTT or close to it.

All this said, I've not purposefully aged any Cubans and certainly don't possess any that are older then three years and they seem to taste just like they did ROTT bur we are talking a limited sample set from myself. I do find the Vega Robainas to get creamier after a year or so.

pullins10
08-11-2015, 11:11 AM
Thanks guys! Super helfpul!!

massphatness
08-11-2015, 11:13 AM
We're always glad to helf!

pnoon
08-11-2015, 11:14 AM
One other word of advice, Cuban cigars across the board are very different in profile than what you might expect. They are nothing like cigars from other countries. I am not saying they are better or worse - just different.

dvickery
08-11-2015, 11:20 AM
Chad

Most of the heavy hitters here have spoken out ... You are a lucky man.

For me ... All I can say is ... It depends on the size of yer stash ... Got a five pack and couple of singles ( we all had to start somewhere ) then wait about a month ... Got a few thousand cigars then wait a decade .

Derrek

AdamJoshua
08-11-2015, 12:05 PM
If you want something that's available and a bit fresher, there is a Monte 2 i sent you with the trade sampler, that i believe was a '13 and smoking incredibly well.

pullins10
08-11-2015, 12:26 PM
If you want something that's available and a bit fresher, there is a Monte 2 i sent you with the trade sampler, that i believe was a '13 and smoking incredibly well.

YES!!! Absolutely Amazing. And the Upman #2. They were my first CC every and got my wheels turning in a thousand directions.

thanks again for kicking a noob in the face.

Adriftpanda
08-11-2015, 12:45 PM
There's no right answer. If something is smoking great now, who knows how it will change 10 years from now. Old doesn't always mean great.

Glad we can be helfful

AdamJoshua
08-11-2015, 06:59 PM
YES!!! Absolutely Amazing. And the Upman #2. They were my first CC every and got my wheels turning in a thousand directions.

thanks again for kicking a noob in the face.

You're welcome, glad you enjoyed them and welcome to the slope.

:adam

mosesbotbol
08-12-2015, 06:15 AM
There's no right answer.

Well, for sure if you can get fresh cigars or well aged cigars they'll be good. If you're in a locale where you can buy in person, a good shop will point you to a winner every time.

I am point where I have "enough" cigars. I tell my vendors "I want a Churchill or Gran Corona... What's your best smoking one you have?" I'll trust their opinion and just go with it. Doesn't matter so much what marca it is...