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pnoon
12-28-2014, 08:01 PM
Anyone use black garlic?

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_hLoQxRyGr-w/S7uyxwWfbnI/AAAAAAAAAGA/SGkBuzKmIWk/s1600/BlackGarlic.jpg

My brother just introduced me to it.
Tonight I made linguini with olive oil, black garlic, basil, and a bit of ground sausage. It was delicious.

Flynnster
12-28-2014, 08:06 PM
I'm intrigued, where are you getting it? And what sort of texture does it have?

pnoon
12-28-2014, 08:09 PM
I'm intrigued, where are you getting it? And what sort of texture does it have?

Trader Joe's.
http://p-fst1.pixstatic.com/5391e04ddbfa3f2b04000481/_w.540_s.fit_/05-2014%20Black%20Garlic.jpg

The cloves are very soft. Not at all what I expected.

MarkinCA
12-28-2014, 08:13 PM
I really had not heard of it until now. Here's one place that has it. Probably others as well...

http://blackgarlic.foodoro.com/store/products/peeled-black-garlic-55-oz

The above link shows they are out of stock until Jan 5th, but it is one place to look for BG...

Oh, TJ has it. Cool!

Flynnster
12-28-2014, 08:29 PM
Looks like I'll be making a trip to TJs soon. I love me some garlic.

MarkinCA
12-28-2014, 08:32 PM
Peter, have you popped one in your mouth for effect? I'm sure it's much different than a fresh one...

pnoon
12-28-2014, 08:35 PM
I have not popped a whole clove. But I did taste a small piece. Much sweeter than I expected. And not as garlicky.

Ogre
12-28-2014, 08:36 PM
New to me, will have to give it a try

MarkinCA
12-28-2014, 08:37 PM
I have not popped a whole clove. But I did taste a small piece. Much sweeter than I expected. And not as garlicky.

...:tu

cigarmarine
12-28-2014, 08:59 PM
Thanks I hope my trader joes has it

Flynnster
12-28-2014, 09:05 PM
So, this is like the Maduro of the garlic world?

mk05
12-28-2014, 09:07 PM
This is cool! I'll have to incorporate, perhaps with squid ink.

bobarian
12-28-2014, 09:07 PM
Saw this yesterday at TJ's. Looks like I should bought some. :bh

pnoon
12-28-2014, 09:21 PM
This is cool! I'll have to incorporate, perhaps with squid ink.

Too pretentious.:2

Dave128
12-28-2014, 09:30 PM
Curious, wouldn't you get the same sweet effect by roasting regular garlic?

pnoon
12-28-2014, 10:04 PM
Curious, wouldn't you get the same sweet effect by roasting regular garlic?

Not even close.
I've roasted garlic many times. Doesn't taste anything like black garlic.

RevSmoke
12-28-2014, 11:13 PM
Curious, wouldn't you get the same sweet effect by roasting regular garlic?

Not even close.
I've roasted garlic many times. Doesn't taste anything like black garlic.

Yeah, for roasted garlic to have the same taste, it looks to me like you have to roast it to the point of burnt. :D

mosesbotbol
12-29-2014, 06:11 AM
Not as garlicky as noted earlier. If you use it, don't add a ton of other seasonings. Let the black garlic take center stage. Nice simple dishes to show it off at first.

shilala
12-29-2014, 06:20 AM
Huh. The Japanese call that "fermented". I always called it spoiled.
I suppose it's perfectly fine to eat once the fruit flies leave, right?

GreekGodX
12-29-2014, 08:09 AM
Do not not not use it in a dessert!! Had it in a chocolate dessert made by a chef in a tasting menu and the garlic taste was still too strong.

Dave128
12-29-2014, 09:24 AM
I'm going to have to give it a try. Sounds interesting.

mk05
12-29-2014, 01:50 PM
Too pretentious.:2
https://warosu.org/data/tg/img/0256/77/1372347845494.jpg

:D :D :D

markem
12-29-2014, 01:59 PM
I've been talking to a friend who is an executive chef for a highly rated restaurant in Spokane (Clover). He says that black garlic is well known and difficult to pair for westerners as we do not have a refined enough palette. He recommends a bacon and spinach salad with a salty Brie.

mk05
12-29-2014, 02:31 PM
I've been talking to a friend who is an executive chef for a highly rated restaurant in Spokane (Clover). He says that black garlic is well known and difficult to pair for westerners as we do not have a refined enough palette. He recommends a bacon and spinach salad with a salty Brie.

That's (hopefully) not what he meant. As an Asian who transplanted to Oregon early, I understand both Eastern/Western palates and preferences innately. What I've found is that Americans do not have a taste for umami - it is the black hole in their palate. The concept was, and is, practically unknown to most here. The idea (and the taste) is so foreign, that the word literally does not exist in the English language.

The chef does know what he is talking about. Umami does well balanced with salty and fatty sweet. It would be passable with bacon and fresh baby spinach, which is another great example of umami hiding in plain sight. Bacon fat has an umami texture, as do cheese and spinach. What the chef is looking to do is introduce Asian umami (black garlic) by relating with known Western umami, so even if the taster has no idea, it makes sense subconsciously.

mosesbotbol
12-29-2014, 04:22 PM
That's (hopefully) not what he meant. As an Asian who transplanted to Oregon early, I understand both Eastern/Western palates and preferences innately. What I've found is that Americans do not have a taste for umami - it is the black hole in their palate. The concept was, and is, practically unknown to most here. The idea (and the taste) is so foreign, that the word literally does not exist in the English language.

The chef does know what he is talking about. Umami does well balanced with salty and fatty sweet. It would be passable with bacon and fresh baby spinach, which is another great example of umami hiding in plain sight. Bacon fat has an umami texture, as do cheese and spinach. What the chef is looking to do is introduce Asian umami (black garlic) by relating with known Western umami, so even if the taster has no idea, it makes sense subconsciously.

I had the most insane wild mushroom and yellow noodle soup recently in Singapore. Famous place called Din Tai Fung; a Chinese food chain in South East Asia. The umami flavors were so amazing, I almost fell of my chair!

Americans that do not think of umami flavor just need a few strong umami dishes to associate the flavor with the name. Most know flavor, but may not have the descriptor or memory point.

T.G
12-29-2014, 05:18 PM
That's (hopefully) not what he meant. As an Asian who transplanted to Oregon early, I understand both Eastern/Western palates and preferences innately. What I've found is that Americans do not have a taste for umami - it is the black hole in their palate. The concept was, and is, practically unknown to most here. The idea (and the taste) is so foreign, that the word literally does not exist in the English language.


By that logic, neither did the Japanese prior to the early 1900's, when they invented the word.

:rolleyes:

AdamJoshua
12-29-2014, 07:23 PM
Sounds good, but not enough to make my squid ink.

markem
12-29-2014, 07:52 PM
That's (hopefully) not what he meant.

I am pretty sure that I am quoting him correctly. Some people think that "refined" equates only with "elegant and cultured" while missing the equally important "developed or improved so as to be precise".

mk05
12-29-2014, 11:02 PM
I had the most insane wild mushroom and yellow noodle soup recently in Singapore. Famous place called Din Tai Fung; a Chinese food chain in South East Asia. The umami flavors were so amazing, I almost fell of my chair!

Americans that do not think of umami flavor just need a few strong umami dishes to associate the flavor with the name. Most know flavor, but may not have the descriptor or memory point.

Exactly, all you need is a couple things to relate to what you already know, then associate that to umami, as said above.

By that logic, neither did the Japanese prior to the early 1900's, when they invented the word.

:rolleyes:
OK...so they got a hundred years head start being able to use it with mastery. This is like rolling your eyes at people using gunpowder vs bows and arrows. Or rolling your eyes at Copernicus or the guy who discovered that the world is round. Or a German rolling his eyes at the English because Shakespeare just discovered some words several hundred years ago. But this isn't the point, the point is that all you need is to relate and associate, and open your mind to new ideas.

Genetic Defect
12-29-2014, 11:07 PM
Yes, yummy.

T.G
12-30-2014, 09:32 AM
OK...so they got a hundred years head start being able to use it with mastery. This is like rolling your eyes at people using gunpowder vs bows and arrows. Or rolling your eyes at Copernicus or the guy who discovered that the world is round. Or a German rolling his eyes at the English because Shakespeare just discovered some words several hundred years ago. But this isn't the point, the point is that all you need is to relate and associate, and open your mind to new ideas.

No, I was rolling my eyes at you. Not them.

Moses hit the nail on the head, umami had been there all along, it just needs to be pointed out. Prior to the invention of the the word by the man who isolated msg as a way to describe the specific flavor sensation it creates, everything was just lumped in under "savory".

Once it's pointed out, it's amazing how fast people look back and go "oh, I've always wondered what that flavor / sensation was"

mk05
12-30-2014, 09:54 AM
Yes! Exactly. Umami has always been there, but no one termed it. I was agreeing by telling Mark that all people need is to relate and then associate, I don't know why you'd be rolling your eyes at me.

T.G
12-30-2014, 10:14 AM
:lr :lr :lr

hammondc
01-16-2015, 07:25 PM
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