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View Full Version : Could use some training advice for a half marathon.


Chainsaw13
01-24-2012, 09:18 PM
I'm dead set on running a half marathon sometime this year. I could really use some help setting up a training plan to reach my goal. Has anyone used the plans on the CoolRunning website? I've been reading through them and a not sure how to make it all work. I really don't have 5k/10k paces yet, as I've only run 2 5k's and no 10k's. Currently I'm running 4-5 days a week on my treadmill, doing about 20-25 miles total. I try to vary my runs, some days doing a simulated 5k trying to set a new best time, or slowing the pace and going for distance/duration. Today for example I felt good and did 8.4 miles in just over 80 minutes (I was running for time).

My plan had been to do a 10k come spring, plus some other 5k's and the Warrior Dash, then do the 1/2 in the fall. Even though things are going good now, I'm going to stick to that as work may throw a monkey wrench into those plans.

So if anyone can offer advice, or help with a plan, I'd appreciate it.

kaisersozei
01-25-2012, 07:14 AM
A couple years ago when I bought my Nike+ trainers, their website had a few programs built around your level of conditioning. They have a 12 week program to prepare for a half-marathon. Don't think you need to have the Nike+ device, just need an account.

http://nikerunning.nike.com/nikeos/p/nikeplus/en_US/plus/#//dashboard/

Chainsaw13
01-25-2012, 07:25 AM
Thanks Gerard, I'll check that out.

goomer
02-01-2012, 10:01 PM
There are a ton of plans out there. Some free, some not. Most will start you off doing some sprints 2 to 3 days a week and a long, slow run day. After a few weeks of that you'll move more to mid length runs and start to increase the length of your runs and the amount of miles per week. The key is to not increase the length of your long runs or the total amount of miles per week too fast. I.E. increase the length of your long/slow run by a mile each week and your overall mileage by no more that a few miles per week. Runners world has a program on their website for free that looked pretty good. Of course you can upgrade the training program for a fee but I don't think there's a need. Good luck with the training! :tu

Chainsaw13
02-02-2012, 04:47 PM
Thanks Sean. My old boss turned me on to a site called marathon rookie. They have some good, simple plans in there, describing pretty much what you're saying. I've kinda been doing that on my own already, trying to increase my long run of the week by an extra 5-10 minutes and not caring about distance. That'll all work itself out.

The big issue will be work travel and being able to get the necessary runs in. Hopefully the new guy works out and can take some pressure off on my travel schedule.

kelmac07
02-02-2012, 05:45 PM
Bob...here's my sound advice...don't do it. :D

Gophernut
02-17-2012, 10:48 AM
Bob...here's my sound advice...don't do it. :D

:tpd:

My sister ran a full marathon a few years ago, doing the same race two years in a row. She did it by locating a running club in her area. She said it really helped her with motivation. Knowing that she would let others down if she didn't show up for training was a huge boost for her. Just a thought. I have only run one 5k and I thought I was going to die at about .5k. Much more of a :su than a runner.

Chainsaw13
02-17-2012, 11:53 AM
That's something I'll look into Steve, joining a running club. The training and motivation would be a big help to me. Right now it's more of a mental issue, to keep running for extended periods of time.

Chainsaw13
07-12-2012, 11:44 AM
Finally signed up for a half marathon. Going to be running the Detroit Free Press International half. You start in Detroit, cross the Ambassador Bridge into Windsor, Canada, run a few miles there, then back through the tunnel into Detroit. 13 weeks to train now.

racerX
07-12-2012, 03:59 PM
Finally signed up for a half marathon. Going to be running the Detroit Free Press International half. You start in Detroit, cross the Ambassador Bridge into Windsor, Canada, run a few miles there, then back through the tunnel into Detroit. 13 weeks to train now.


That is the best thing you could have done. Once you sign up your motivation sky rockets.
I find running outside much more entertaining than tread mill.
Another trick about running outside is if you don't run in a circle, but do a out in back you will motivate yourself by simply having to make it back home.:D

Try the Nike+ site. I GPS all my runs and it's fun to have the site track them all.

Great job on your part. I'm rooting for you!:tu

markem
07-12-2012, 04:06 PM
A half marathon is basically just 2 10Ks. Way back when I still had functional knees and a real left arch, I trained for mountaineering by running during the week. It seemed forever that I could not get past 5 miles. Then I got a new roommate that was a marathoner. We went out for a short run and I suddenly realized that I was still 5 miles from home. He told me that I would run or walk it back. It was amazingly easy to go above the 5 mile mark after that. Until I moved from Seattle in 1989, I ran half marathons on Tuesday and Thursday as training for mountaineering on the weekends. My race pace was 7:15. Not fast but not slow either.

I'm going to try to do the couch to 5K plan, once I get some orthotics for my left foot. I miss running and am determined to get back in to it. It's not a bad way to exercise in a rainy climate like ours.

Chainsaw13
07-12-2012, 04:35 PM
Thanks for the advice and encouragement guys. I kept saying I wanted to do one, but I knew if I didn't register, it wouldn't happen. I'm waiting for it to cool down a bit before I head out this evening.

Joneser172
07-19-2012, 08:19 PM
Congrats on signing up for you first half and good job so far! I think you'll find that regardless of your prep you will find a way to finish come race day. All of the resources mentioned earlier are pretty good. Just find something that works for you and something you can stick to. I would recommend incorporating some plyometrics into your routine. This will strengthen you up and increase overall performance. Also, do some sprints occasionally to get your heart into overdrive. Just be careful not to overdo it and recognize your limitations. Anyway, good luck and have a blast!

Chainsaw13
07-19-2012, 08:39 PM
Congrats on signing up for you first half and good job so far! I think you'll find that regardless of your prep you will find a way to finish come race day. All of the resources mentioned earlier are pretty good. Just find something that works for you and something you can stick to. I would recommend incorporating some plyometrics into your routine. This will strengthen you up and increase overall performance. Also, do some sprints occasionally to get your heart into overdrive. Just be careful not to overdo it and recognize your limitations. Anyway, good luck and have a blast!

Thanks. On a recommendation I got the book "The Nonrunners Marathon Trainer". Good book so far. I figured can use it to prep for the half and then should I want to do a full one, I have a good reference to get there. Today was a easy 3 mile run. I did just over 5k in my best time yet.

hammondc
07-19-2012, 08:55 PM
There are a TON of programs out there. They all do something right and they all do something wrong. My only advice - since you are novice runner - is to be very careful increasing mileage. No more than 10% per week. IMHO, even that is pushing it.

Ok...so 2 pieces of advice. Try to get outside for at least half your runs. Treadmill vs real road is a lot different.

Chainsaw13
07-19-2012, 09:06 PM
Ok...so 2 pieces of advice. Try to get outside for at least half your runs. Treadmill vs real road is a lot different.

Yep, that's my plan. Been running outside as much as possible, evenin the heat (lots of water). Today was great. 72ish, overcast with a bit of rain.

Mugen910
07-19-2012, 09:28 PM
one foot in front of the other...and keep your head up.

The hardest part is getting to the starting line.

FYI (http://www.halhigdon.com/training/)

hammondc
07-20-2012, 09:16 AM
one foot in front of the other...and keep your head up.

The hardest part is getting to the starting line.

FYI (http://www.halhigdon.com/training/)

+1 on Hal Higdon. If you get your miles up and keep running, the Firman 'FIRST' training program is good too.

Chainsaw13
07-20-2012, 09:22 AM
+1 on Hal Higdon. If you get your miles up and keep running, the Firman 'FIRST' training program is good too.

I was checking this out last night. I like how he has different plans for each race, depending upon your level and what your goals are. I'll have to check out the Firman First program too. I've been running for over a year now and find I really enjoy it, so I plan on sticking with it for the long haul.

Chainsaw13
10-20-2012, 12:55 PM
Tomorrow is the run. Last couple of weeks training has been lacking due to a bit of tendinitis in the ankle. Found out about KT Tape last night. Just taped up the ankle, feels 100% better. That and some ibuprofen and ill be right as rain. I've been so amped all this week, and especially today. Gotta keep the energy in check so I don't go out too fast at the start. I'll post my results when I get home.

Chainsaw13
10-21-2012, 02:18 PM
Unofficial time was around 2: 28 to finish the half. I started to have some cramping issues around mile 9 so that slowed me down. I'm thrilled though to just have finished so I'm not going to stress out on the time. I'll worry about that if/when I run another.