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innova
03-01-2011, 09:16 PM
Being a firm believer in the Maillard Reaction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction), I'm always trying to get a great sear on beef. During the winter, I generally preheat a cast iron skillet in the oven at 500, then move it to the gas range for a bit, then drop the steaks in for a couple mins/side before i move it to the broiler to finish. This worked ok, but it doesn't take long for the sear to turn to more of a "fry" when the fat overtakes the heat.

This week the weather broke a bit and I was able to fire up the grill. So I lit the chimney charcoal, and dumped them in the weber when they were ready, and immediately placed the cast iron directly in the coals for about 10 minutes. When I dropped the ribeyes on that thing, I got that high pitch sizzle I've only heard in restaurants, and it seared the whole time, "dry". I couldn't believe the difference.

Anyone use this method or have any input on getting a great, high temp sear? I may try putting the cast iron directly on the charcoal chimney, as I hear this reaches temps nearing 1000F. Grilling season is just about here in the mid-atlantic!

-innova

Smokin Gator
03-02-2011, 05:56 AM
I use a medium big green egg to sear. I get it to around 750 and drop the steak directly on the cooking grate. I close the lid for 90 seconds. The I open the lid and rotate the steak 90 degrees to get the pretty grill marks. I close the lid for 90 more seconds. Then I open the lid, flip the steak and give it 90 more seconds with the lid down. Then I pull them off, set them on a plate and cover them in foil. I usually let the cooker come down to 400 degrees and put them back on until they reach the internal temp I want. Lately though I have been moving them to a preheated cast iron skillet and putting them in a 400 degree oven to finish them off.

mosesbotbol
03-02-2011, 06:28 AM
I just bought a new pan exclusive for searing indoors a deBuyer Mineral pan. Works like a charm, but is specifically needs to be seasoned and can be a pain for some. If you want the best of France has to offer to sear, this pan is it.

The pan becomes totally black and non-stick with proper use.

http://www.debuyer.com/images/product/551020.jpg

http://www.debuyer.com/product.php?id=711&cat=60&background=bleu1

mmblz
03-02-2011, 06:35 AM
22k BTUs does the trick...

http://www.bluestarcooking.com/images/banner_44.jpg

http://www.bluestarcooking.com/about-bluestar-features.html

OLS
03-02-2011, 08:28 AM
I like the taste of a steak that was basically seared ONLY. I like grilled steak, and I like broiled steak, but the
sear creates the crust I like and the delicious juicy innards. Lately I am not liking what the grill does with steak
MORE than a pan sear. I used to be grill only.

GoatLocker
04-20-2011, 12:35 AM
Like this. First steaks on a new Weber. 180 sec on each side = medium rare.

CigarNut
04-20-2011, 11:18 AM
My outdoor drill has a searing burner and I use that to do my searing -- rain or shine -- all year round. I love it!

T.G
04-20-2011, 11:21 AM
My outdoor drill has a searing burner and I use that to do my searing -- rain or shine -- all year round. I love it!

I knew Makita cordlesses ran hot, but that's a little extreme... ;)

CigarNut
04-20-2011, 12:16 PM
I knew Makita cordlesses ran hot, but that's a little extreme... ;)It's a DeWalt :)

T.G
04-20-2011, 12:32 PM
It's a DeWalt :)

Balla!

LostAbbott
04-20-2011, 12:34 PM
I just bought a 1/4 grass fed and finished red angus so I will be working on this with quite a few nice steaks this Summer. They are currently dry ageing the beef for 14 days then it is off to the butcher who is custom cutting to my specs.

Thanks for the great thread.

dadof3illinois
04-20-2011, 09:45 PM
Both a skillet and the grill will work. The sear just hardens/cooks the very outside of the meat to keep the juice/flavors in. Your broiler in your oven is actually the same as your grill, just upside down and doesn't let the fat drain away. With that said your always going to get a different, softer, sear when using a skillet. Not that the meat isn't actually seared shut it just doesn't have that crispy crust....which I love....around the meat.

I like it both ways. When I use a skillet and the broiler, as soon as I pull the steaks out of the oven I use the juices along with butter, white wine, cream and some mushrooms for a wonderful sauce that only takes about a minute to make.

innova
04-20-2011, 09:48 PM
All great ideas, cool to hear everyone's tried and true methods. The problem i've had with ribeyes (the high fat content) is that that the heat can't keep up with the melted fat, and my "dry sear" turns to more of a frying operation. This is using the skillet in or above the coals. I think switching to a cast iron grate would fix that.

Has anyone tried a standalone IR plate for searing?

dadof3illinois
04-20-2011, 09:54 PM
All great ideas, cool to hear everyone's tried and true methods. The problem i've had with ribeyes (the high fat content) is that that the heat can't keep up with the melted fat, and my "dry sear" turns to more of a frying operation. This is using the skillet in or above the coals. I think switching to a cast iron grate would fix that.

Has anyone tried a standalone IR plate for searing?


what temp are you using? Sounds like your not near hot enough?

innova
04-20-2011, 09:55 PM
This is over fresh coals dumped out of charcoal chimney, should be around 600˚F if not more.

dadof3illinois
04-20-2011, 10:10 PM
This is over fresh coals dumped out of charcoal chimney, should be around 600˚F if not more.


Well, that's going to sear the meat just fine. Now a lot of the high end steak houses use even higher temps in their ovens and have large stainless flat griddles or large skillets so the fat will move away from the meat.

innova
04-20-2011, 10:13 PM
Yeah, I've heard temps nearing 1200˚, insane.

BC-Axeman
04-20-2011, 10:23 PM
Once it has that pretty crosshatch on both sides it's done.:tu
I don't pan sear but I will try it for lunch tomorrow.
Rare steak is healthiest for you, I've heard.

dadof3illinois
04-20-2011, 10:28 PM
Yeah, I've heard temps nearing 1200˚, insane.

yea, several places in Chicago use 900+. The ovens they use are gas fired from both the top and bottom so the steaks are cooked super fast with a wonderful sear & char on the outside.

innova
04-20-2011, 10:29 PM
I'm a believer in the Malliard Reaction.

Jason
04-20-2011, 11:59 PM
make sure your steaks come up to room temp while salted, key to a good crust and getting a nice med rare after 3-4 min sear per side with a 1"+ cut, I use cast iron hot as I can get it

CigarNut
04-21-2011, 09:04 AM
make sure your steaks come up to room temp while salted, key to a good crust and getting a nice med rare after 3-4 min sear per side with a 1"+ cut, I use cast iron hot as I can get itI also prefer to let my steaks come up to room temp, but I know that alot of people are against this. I think this gives any seasonings/marinades time to soak in...

Just my :2

fxpose
04-21-2011, 12:16 PM
For a supercharged sear I like to use my charcoal chimney starter with a small cast iron grate sitting on top. A quick 30 second sear per side on the ahi is all it needs.

My Lodge cast iron hibachi is perfect for searing steaks too. Superhot and perfect grill marks too.

http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c362/jojisan/P1050683.jpg

timj219
04-21-2011, 01:11 PM
make sure your steaks come up to room temp while salted, key to a good crust and getting a nice med rare after 3-4 min sear per side with a 1"+ cut, I use cast iron hot as I can get itIt helps to blot the steaks with paper towel just before throwing on the fire. Any moisture that collects while the steaks sit out (especially if salted) will diminish the sear.

BC-Axeman
04-21-2011, 03:08 PM
Pan seared a steak for lunch. I think grilled is a bit better but searing is a lot better than broiled.
Just my first try though.

68TriShield
04-21-2011, 03:59 PM
http://i98.photobucket.com/albums/l250/68Trishield/Flame_Thrower.jpg

:D

Aero95
04-21-2011, 08:58 PM
http://i98.photobucket.com/albums/l250/68Trishield/Flame_Thrower.jpg

:D

Works great on steaks and lighting cigars at a herf!!

OLS
04-22-2011, 07:28 AM
I like the Mallard reaction, too....throw bread in water and they come from nowhere.

dadof3illinois
04-22-2011, 08:11 AM
I like the Mallard reaction, too....throw bread in water and they come from nowhere.

:r But it makes them so easy to shoot!!!!!!.......LOL

thermal
07-12-2011, 09:55 AM
If you wanted to add a bit of flavor use salt and ground pepper, and use it to coat the top and bottom where you are searing it.