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View Full Version : best bread recipe and yeast?


Joan
11-14-2008, 02:20 PM
Fleischmann's isn't doing it for my artisan rounds. What are you bread bakers using to lift your loaf? ;)

Ron1YY
11-14-2008, 02:37 PM
Never tried to make bread aside from in a bread machine. I'd be interested in going for it

md4958
11-14-2008, 02:43 PM
Fleischmann's isn't doing it for my artisan rounds. What are you bread bakers using to lift your loaf? ;)

try using active dry yeast and letting it bloom in warm (not too hot) water for about 15 minutes.

then, for the best flavor let your dough rise slowly in the refridgerator over night. Punch it down in the morning, roll your loaf and then let it bench proof until it has doubled in size.

You can also keep punching down and letting re-rise in the fridge for a few days. IMO the longer you let the dough rise the better flavor youll get.

Also, in your recipe always add a little sugar for the yeast to consume. And remember salt RETARDS yeast growth, so if you have too much you will not get a good rise.

If you need a recipe lemme know

happy baking,
Moe

bazookajoe
11-14-2008, 03:30 PM
try using active dry yeast and letting it bloom in warm (not too hot) water for about 15 minutes.

then, for the best flavor let your dough rise slowly in the refridgerator over night. Punch it down in the morning, roll your loaf and then let it bench proof until it has doubled in size.

You can also keep punching down and letting re-rise in the fridge for a few days. IMO the longer you let the dough rise the better flavor youll get.

Also, in your recipe always add a little sugar for the yeast to consume. And remember salt RETARDS yeast growth, so if you have too much you will not get a good rise...

:tpd:

If you have access to fresh (cake) yeast you can skip the blooming step, softening the yeast in warm water and just crumbling it into the dough before kneading. With fresh yeast the dough will need to rise twice. http://support.jodohost.com/images/smilies/hungry.gif

Joan
11-15-2008, 10:32 AM
Never tried to make bread aside from in a bread machine. I'd be interested in going for it

Ooo yeah, I'd love to see your version of rosemary olive bread! GO for it!

Joan
11-15-2008, 10:35 AM
try using active dry yeast and letting it bloom in warm (not too hot) water for about 15 minutes.

then, for the best flavor let your dough rise slowly in the refridgerator over night. Punch it down in the morning, roll your loaf and then let it bench proof until it has doubled in size.

You can also keep punching down and letting re-rise in the fridge for a few days. IMO the longer you let the dough rise the better flavor youll get.

Also, in your recipe always add a little sugar for the yeast to consume. And remember salt RETARDS yeast growth, so if you have too much you will not get a good rise.

If you need a recipe lemme know

happy baking,
Moe


Good basic handling tips! I forget about that salt thing, DAG. Seems like a little coarse grind sea salt is SO good in the finished product, but my "little bit" makes bricks instead of bread coming out of the oven. Bother.

Joan
11-15-2008, 10:37 AM
:tpd:

If you have access to fresh (cake) yeast you can skip the blooming step, softening the yeast in warm water and just crumbling it into the dough before kneading. With fresh yeast the dough will need to rise twice. http://support.jodohost.com/images/smilies/hungry.gif

OOO! Okay! I will get some fresh cake today, try it out tomorrow! Excellent!

Ron1YY
11-15-2008, 10:45 AM
Ooo yeah, I'd love to see your version of rosemary olive bread! GO for it!

Now I'm going to have to go hunt this recipe down :dr Sounds REAL GOOD!!!!!!!

Demented
11-15-2008, 01:08 PM
I use Red Star active dry yeast. Here's my recipe for Italian bead,

Sponge
100gr. Bread flour
1 t. Dry yeast
1 C. water, 110
Mix yeast and water, allow to proof. With a wooden spoon slowly mix flour into water, cover with a damp flour sack towel let sit overnight.

Dough
400 500 gr. Bread flour
2T. Dry yeast
2 T. Salt
2 C. Water 120 - 130

Stir down the sponge then add water, yeast and salt, mix well.

Add flour 1/2 C. at a time mixing after each addition until a shaggy mass has formed, the dough should clean the sides of the bowl.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface.

If using a mixer, use the flat beater to mix the sponge, water, yeast, salt and the first two or three additions of flour.

Once the dough starts gaining mass switch to the dough hook.

Knead it for about 10 minutes; adding just enough flour to keep it from sticking, too much flour will toughen the dough.

Place a casserole half full of hot water on the floor of the oven, before putting dough in the oven to rise.

Let it rise for 1 1/2 hours, the dough needs to double in size.

Push the dough down, fold it in on itself a couple of times before turning the dough out and kneading it 10 minutes.

Return dough to the bowl and the bowl to the oven, do this for each rising.

Let it rise a second time until it has doubled in size, about an hour.

Push the dough down, fold it in on itself a couple of times before turning the dough out and kneading it 10 minutes.

Let it rise a third time until it has doubled in size, about an hour.

Turn the dough out onto a baking sheet, shape it into a loaf with as little handling as possible.

Pour boiling water in the casserole on the floor of the oven.

Bake the loaf at 400 for 15 minutes; turn the baking sheet around, remove the casserole then bake 300 for 25 35 minutes or until the loaf sounds hollow when the bottom is thumped.

md4958
11-15-2008, 01:12 PM
Good basic handling tips! I forget about that salt thing, DAG. Seems like a little coarse grind sea salt is SO good in the finished product, but my "little bit" makes bricks instead of bread coming out of the oven. Bother.

Joan, make sure you use some salt in your bread, or else it will taste like cardboard.

Blooming your yeast will give it a good head start and adding a touch of sugar will help get it going too. The sugar and salt balance each out.

I made pizza dough once that i added too much salt to. They looked more like tortillas when they came out of the oven!

Joan
11-16-2008, 05:03 PM
I use Red Star active dry yeast. Here's my recipe for Italian bread,


Mmmm... good recipe, D! How long have you been using the Red Star? I remember Gram used say anything with a red star on it meant it was made by commies! [she laughs] which is why she always used Fleischman's, and I guess I just bake the way she did...

Are you using jar or packet Red Star?

Joan
11-16-2008, 05:08 PM
Joan, make sure you use some salt in your bread, or else it will taste like cardboard.

Blooming your yeast will give it a good head start and adding a touch of sugar will help get it going too. The sugar and salt balance each out.

I made pizza dough once that i added too much salt to. They looked more like tortillas when they came out of the oven!

:r

That's funny! I've made a lot of those tortillas, too. I mean A LOT! :D

I got a four loaf batch resting nicely on the sideboard right now, thanks to everyone's yeast advice. [deep bow] Thank Yew! :tu

Mmmmm.... fresh bread with bison stew tonight, and a tart spinach salad with Honey Crisp apples and Pt. Reyes Blue. :dr

Demented
11-17-2008, 04:03 AM
Hey Joan,

Been using Red Star close to 20 years.

I buy the jar out of habit, use to go through 10 15 pounds of bread flour a month. Don't bake so much any more should probably start buying packets.

Joan
11-17-2008, 02:42 PM
Hey Joan,

Been using Red Star close to 20 years.

I buy the jar out of habit, use to go through 10 15 pounds of bread flour a month. Don't bake so much any more should probably start buying packets.

I guess you're not afraid of those commie pinkos taking over your cupboard then? [major snork][giggle giggle] Good times around the kitchen. :D

And thanks to you all, last night's rounds are all gone.... brought the other three small loaves to the office with a pint of fresh whirled tapenade and *poof*. That Red Star is pretty good, bloomed like mad with a pinch of sugar!